Rules Updates

Rules Reference

  1. Rolling Statistics
    1. Character statistics will be rolled using the 4d6 x 6 method. If more than four rolls total (before die drop) less than 20, the player may reroll the entire ability score line. This guarantees at least two scores over a 15.
  2. Races
    1. Prebuilt races are permitted, except as outlined below. This includes variant abilities.
    2. Monstrous races are permitted, provided they can be built to my satisfaction using the rules in the Advanced Race Guide. If you want to play a gnoll sailor, and call him a salty dog, be my guest.
    3. Multi-armed (more than two arms) races are not permitted, as they cause rules complications. Races from other planets are not permitted, for flavor. Other restrictions may apply, at GM’s discretion.
  3. Classes
    1. All classes and archetypes are permitted, provided the following:
    2. Alternate classes may not be chosen alongside their parent class;
    3. Multiple archetypes may be used, so long as they do not conflict on ability replacement;
    4. Conflicting archetypes may be used, based on a good argument, at GM’s discretion.
    5. The following Unchained rules are in effect:
    6. Fractional Base Bonus, which avoids potential problems when multiclassing (alternate bonus progression, see me for details);
    7. Staggered Advancement, which splits each level into four steps, with minor advances in ability at each step, which provides constant progression throughout the game;
    8. Variant Multiclassing, provided the VMC class target is not later multiclassed into (including alternate classes). VMC provides some of the benefits of a second class, in exchange for the use of five feats.
  4. Skills
    1. Skills are based off of the Background Skills and Skill Groups alternate rules, outlined below.
    2. Skills are grouped into Skill Groups. On character creation, a character chooses a number of skill groups based on her class; the number of skill group choices increases with level. All skills in that skill group are treated as having a number of ranks equal to half the character’s level. Characters also receive a number of Skill Specialties, based on level and Intelligence. A character can invest Skill Specialties in any skill, granting that skill a number of ranks equal to half of her level. At first level, a character also gains a bonus Skill Specialty, which can only be used on a Background Skill (noted on your sheet), representing the character’s interest prior to the campaign.
    3. There are two new skills, both Background Skills: Lore and Artistry. Lore represents specific knowledge. The more specific a Lore skill is, the more useful it is on that subject. Example: Knowledge (Taverns) would represent a general knowledge of taverns, including their general function and layout, some idea of how taverns in various lands. Lore (The Hog’s Head Tavern), meanwhile, represents a specific interest in a specific tavern, which may include the names of regular clientele, the most commonly available meals and beverages, an average night’s take, which of the stalls has a leak, etc. Artistry, meanwhile, represents the ability to create solid artistic works; Artistry (choreography), for example, would be a skill dedicated to creating new dances and complicated footwork, while Perform (dance) would be dedicated to skill in executing dances. Like Perform, there is a list of common specializations, and one must be chosen for every investment in the skill.
    4. Craft, Perform, and Profession skills now have additional utility; players wishing to invest in these skills may speak with me to receive further details.
    5. New crafting rules are in effect, including new rules on crafting magic items. They make the creation of an item a more involving and satisfying action, with challenges to overcome and potential rewards in the results.
    6. Skill Unlocks are available for Unchained Rogues, or for characters taking the relevant feats. Investing in a skill unlock offers bonuses and abilities for reaching certain levels of training in a skill.
  5. Feats
    1. All feats are available for use; however, the list is exhaustive. Players seeking a certain skill path or set of options are encouraged to consult with me, to help them achieve the desired effect.
  6. Equipment
    1. Characters may choose from any equipment list to purchase the gear.
    2. BE WARNED: The game starts with your equipment and starting funds confiscated! Equipment may be recovered through roleplaying, but remaining starting funds are assumed to have been added to the captain’s personal chest.
    3. The Armor as DR rule is in effect. Armor now provides Damage Resistance instead of an Armor Class Bonus. AC has been replaced by Defense, and represents the ability to avoid being hit.
  7. Additional Rules
    1. Alignment has been removed from the game! Instead, the game is now based around loyalties and relative morality. Players choose three things that their characters are loyal to, in order. The following class restrictions are in play: Paladins, Anti-Paladins, Clerics, and other classes that follow a god must have that god or church as one of their loyalties. For Paladins and Anti-Paladins, this loyalty must be their first loyalty. Penalties normally associated with alignment infractions are instead tied to betraying their loyalties. Barbarians must not choose a loyalty to a discipline, set of laws, or concepts related to discipline and law. Monks must choose a path to enlightenment or set of strictures as their primary loyalty; violating this loyalty causes the Monk to be unable to progress until they have atoned. Other classes may require specific loyalties, on a case-by-case basis.
    2. Spells and abilities that once targeted alignment now target specific qualities or loyalties. Spells that aid target those with friendly loyalties, while those that harm target unfriendly loyalties. Those without a conviction relating to a particular loyalty are considered neutral for this purpose.
    3. Each character starts with one Hero Point, and may be rewarded additional Hero Points based on game events (moments of awesome, excellent roleplaying, etc). These may be spent on a number of effects, such as bonuses to rolls, extra actions, and rerolling dice. No character may have more than three Hero Points at any time.
    4. The party will also have access to a Chaos Chip. The Chaos Chip may be used as a Hero Point at any time. However, doing so passes the Chaos Chip to the GM, who may then use the Chaos Chip himself, allowing him to use a similar effect for an NPC or Monster.
    5. Players are encouraged to use the Background Generator in Ultimate Campaign. They may pick specific results for a specific idea that they had, or may randomly roll on each table, their choice. Characters with fleshed out backgrounds and personalities will receive a bonus Hero Point.
  8. Combat
    1. Hit Points are now accentuated by Adrenaline Points. A character receives as many adrenaline points as their Constitution modifier, plus the number of character levels or Hit Dice they have. During combat, each hit taken by a character is removed from the Adrenaline Point total; after combat ends, or when a character’s Adrenaline reaches zero, they calculate how much damage they have taken and record it on their character sheet. Critical Hits remove a number of Adrenaline Points equal to their damage multiplier.
    2. Hit Points are divided into four stages. When a character’s HP drop below any particular stage, they begin to take penalties on actions, due to the severity of their wounds.
    3. Combat has been revised. Instead of Move and Attack actions, each character uses three Actions. A cheat sheet on the types of actions that can be performed, as well as how many Actions each act uses up, will be provided. Note that this modifies attack progression!
  9. Magic
    1. The following changes to the Magic system are in effect: Limited Magic, Wild Magic, and Active Spellcasting.
    2. Active Spellcasting acts similar to the attack mechanic of melee fighters, allowing a spellcaster to take a more active roll in combat. Spellcasters now roll to target each creature, instead of that creature making a defensive roll.
    3. Limited Magic limits normal spell use to the base level of power for a spell when it first becomes available to a spellcaster. To counter this, a spellcaster may make a Spellcraft check to boost the spell to it’s original power level.
    4. Wild Magic provides bonuses and penalties for spellcasters based on how well they cast a spell, granting spell effects Criticals and Fumbles that produce unusual gameplay effects.
  10. Spells
    1. All spells are available, but vary in rarity. Spells available in the Core Rulebook are common, and may be researched normally. Spells available in the core rules set are uncommon, and take an extra 50% in time and money to research. Spells from the Campaign Setting supplements are rare, and take twice as long and twice as much money to research. Specialist casters reduce the costs for their chosen school by 50%, but increase those of their opposed schools by 50% in exchange.
  11. Prestige Classes
    1. All Prestige Classes are available, but characters are expected to meet EVERY requirement, including the roleplaying requirements.
  12. Environment
    1. Expect lots of water.
  13. Magic Items
    1. Magic Items no longer provide bonuses to attack, defense, or ability scores. Instead, these effects have been rolled into character progression. Items that would have provided these bonuses are instead mastercrafted versions of the original items. Special item effects still exist, and no longer require certain magical bonuses to be added to an item.
    2. Crafting Magic Items has become more involved, and success and failure at each step may impart quirks to the final item, making each item unique in the world. Non-spellcasters may aid a spellcaster in overcoming challenges, but their successes and failures both add to the final result.

Rules Updates

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